Image: Obesity: Sugar-sweetened Beverages, Obesity & Health. Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)

Image: Obesity: Sugar-sweetened Beverages, Obesity & Health. Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)

In 2009, Australia was among the top ten highest consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages globally, and although there are limited recent data quantifying Australian sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, extant data suggests that children are heavy consumers from an early age. Annual sales of soft drinks have increased substantially over the past five decades, with apparent consumption increasing from 45 litres per capita in 1969 to 120 litres per capita in 1999. The 2007 Australian National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey found that 47% of children aged 2-16 years consumed SSB's daily. In the past decade it appears that consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks has decreased, to around 89 litres per capita in 2014. Although there has been a decline in consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, and the sale of other sugar-sweetened beverages has increased.

In 2014, 56% of Australians aged 14-24 drank at least one soft drink in an average seven-day period, up from 53% in 2013. 

Image: Obesity: Sugar-sweetened Beverages, Obesity & Health. Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)

Image: Obesity: Sugar-sweetened Beverages, Obesity & Health. Australian National Preventive Health Agency (2014)